How to Take Measurements

When taking measurements, hold the tape measure with one hand inside, against the body. This will allow a slight amount of ease. The fitting sloper is very close to the body in order to achieve the best assessment of the fit. It also shows if the measurements are accurate or need adjusting. Style ease is added to key measurements once a pattern for a particular style is created. The basic fitting sloper is the mother of all creations. From the basic all your creations will be derived. Some patterns like a half circle or gored skirt do not require so many measurements. These styles are a good start for a pattern drafting.

Photo 1
  • CHEST CIRCUMFERENCE: photo 1A
    Place the tape around the back, under the arm and above the bust.
  • BUST CIRCUMFERENCE: photo 1B
    Around the fullest part of the bust.
  • RIB CAGE CIRCUMFERENCE: photo 1C
    About 3-4″ below the bust.
  • WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE: photo 1D
    Around the waist.
  • ABDOMEN CIRCUMFERENCE: photo 1E
    Around the fullest part of the abdomen, approximately 4: below the waist.
  • WAIST TO ABDOMEN: photo 1F
    From the waist to the circumference of the abdomen, usually 4″ to 5″.
  • HIP CIRCUMFERENCE: photo 1G
    Please note a correction: 1G should be same level as 1H. I made a mistake in labelling the photo.
    Around the fullest part of the hip. Note: I have found it varies with figure type. It can be 7 to 9″ below the waistline.
  • WAIST TO HIP: photo 1H
    Measure the distance from waist to hip.
Photo 2
  • SHOULDER WIDTH: photo 2A-D
    From the side of the neck to the tip of the shoulder.
  • NECK TO BUST LENGTH: photo 2A-B
    On the side of the neck from a point where the shoulder begins, to the bust point.
  • FRONT BODICE LENGTH: photo 2A-C
    From the same point as used in the previous measurement, continue with the tape over the bust, adjusting it to the figure down to the waist.
Photo 3
  • NECKLINE: photo 3A-B
    From the first vertebra following the shape of the neck to the place the seam shoulder begins and then to center front.
Photo 4
  • CROSS CHEST WIDTH: photo 4A-B
    From the point where the arm begins to the same point on the other arm in the front.
  • BUST SEPARATION: photo 4C-D
    Take the distance between the two breast points.
Photo 5
  • BACK BODICE LENGTH: photo 5A-F
    From the first vertebra down, along the back, to the waistline.
  • CROSS BACK WIDTH: photo 5G-H
    In the back, from the point where the arm begins, to the same point on the other arm.
Photo 6
  • FRONT BODICE LENGTH: 6A-C is the side view of measurement given in 2A-C.
  • FRONT SHOULDER TO WAIST: 6D-E
    From the front edge of the shoulder pull the tape tightly down to the waistline.
  • BACK SHOULDER TO WAIST: 6D-F
    From the back edge of the shoulder pull the tape tightly down to the waistline.
Photo 7
  • Please note that in real life the measurements in this section must be taken with the arm bent so that the hand rests on the hip. This way of measuring the arm provides room for movement.
  • ARM LENGTH: photo 7C-d-E
    From the tip of the shoulder to the wrist.
  • UPPER ARM WIDTH: photo 7A
    Take measurement at widest point of arm. Also called Biceps Level.
  • ELBOW WIDTH: photo 7B
    Around the elbow with arm bent.
  • WRIST WIDTH: photo 7E
    Around the wrist.
Photo 8
  • FRONT SKIRT LENGTH: photo 8A-B
    Length from waist to floor at Center Front when wearing the kinds of shoes the outfit will be worn with.
Photo 9
  • SIDE SKIRT LENGTH: photo 9C-D
    Length from waist to floor at point where side seam of skirt will be when wearing the kinds of shoes the outfit will be worn with.
Photo 10
  • BACKSKIRT LENGTH: photo 10E-F
    Length from waist to floor at Center Back when wearing the kinds of shoes the outfit will be worn with.

Published by EmilyAnn Frances

Born and grew up in Brooklyn, New York when it was a borough for working families and businesses. It was the pre-Gentrification Brooklyn where you could see the sky against the trees, mingle with people from all backgrounds and make friends. A place where people bought a house for living in. There were no tourists, rarely a hotel and the word luxury was for those who lived far away. After gentrification I felt no connection to the borough or city I once loved. I now live in Linden, New Jersey where a spirit of community and neighborly interest still exists. Gentrification is not progress. It is displacement. I support all causes that aim for a more equitable and inclusive creation of sustainable urban communities. If you are interested in publishing or serializing content from my blog "Through the Byzantine Gate" please contact me. Only those postings that relate to my immediate family will be available. The branch families and their stories belong to those respective descendants.

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